Happy Valentines Day…

Happy Valentines Day!

Cupid dissecting a heart in a book published in Verona, the setting of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet – does it get more romantic than this?! I don’t think so.

From ‘Cardiomorphoseos sive ex corde desumpta emblemata sacra’ by Francesco Pona, published in Verona, Italy 1665.

L0029157 Francesco Pona, Cardiomorphoses sive ex corde... Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Cupid dissecting a heart. Scrutator es tu. Cardiomorphoseos sive ex corde desumpta emblemata sacra Francesco Pona Published: 1665 Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

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The Spooky Saturday Collection: October 2014

This October saw the start of Spooky Saturday on Facebook and Twitter; a collection of some the most gruesome anatomical artworks I’ve curated through the year.

In the lead up to Halloween, we looked a one piece in all it’s grisly glory each weekend and rated it on the ‘Spooky Scale’.

So, which is the winner? Let’s put it to a vote.

Take a look at the four artworks below and cast your vote in the poll!

 

 1. 'Dissection of a pharynx affected by abscess, shown at post-mortem' from 'Principles of Surgery' by John Bell, 1801.

1. ‘Dissection of a pharynx affected by abscess, shown at post-mortem’ from ‘Principles of Surgery’ by John Bell, 1801.

 

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2. ‘Bone neoplasms on the skull’ from ‘Anatomie pathologique du corps humain’ by Jean Cruveilhier, 1829.

 

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3. Illustration by Max Brödel which was featured in a 1932 article which described “surgical procedures on the eye of a rabbit, illustrating anatomical parts”.

 

'Head and skull of malformed infants; conjoined twins, bilateral cleft lip and holoprosencephaly' from 'Surgical Anatomy' by Joseph Maclise, 1856.

4.’Head and skull of malformed infants; conjoined twins, bilateral cleft lip and holoprosencephaly’ from ‘Surgical Anatomy’ by Joseph Maclise, 1856.

 

Book Review: From Bodysnatchers to Lifesavers: Three Centuries of Medicine in Edinburgh by by Dorothy H. Crawford and Tara Womersley

From Bodysnatchers to Lifesavers: Three Centuries of Medicine in Edinburgh by Dorothy H. Crawford

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I don’t give 5 stars lightly, this book is fantastic! Those of you interested in the history of medicine know that the facts themselves are an interesting read, but the authors of this book wrote it in such a way that you really get to know the key figures from Edinburgh’s medical history and their fascinating careers. Don’t know Edinburgh? Don’t be put off. You will learn the history of some of the world most celebrated discoveries and professionals; from Charles Darwin to Arthur Conan Doyle, from bodysnatchers Burke and Hare to Dolly the Sheep. Reading this gripping book really made me proud, not only to live in a city steeped in such pioneering medical history, but to be working for a Royal College so involved in the advancement of medicine through the centuries to the present day.

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