Happy Valentines Day…

Happy Valentines Day!

Cupid dissecting a heart in a book published in Verona, the setting of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet – does it get more romantic than this?! I don’t think so.

From ‘Cardiomorphoseos sive ex corde desumpta emblemata sacra’ by Francesco Pona, published in Verona, Italy 1665.

L0029157 Francesco Pona, Cardiomorphoses sive ex corde... Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Cupid dissecting a heart. Scrutator es tu. Cardiomorphoseos sive ex corde desumpta emblemata sacra Francesco Pona Published: 1665 Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

The Spooky Saturday Collection: October 2016

Through October I shared some of the creepiest illustrations from my 2016 archived collection using #SpookySaturday on Facebook and Twitter.

In the four Saturdays leading up to Halloween, we looked a one gruesome artwork each week – now it’s time to vote for the spookiest!

 

1. 'Mummified cadaver' from Atlas of Legal Medicine by Eduard von Hofmann, 1898. The body of this 50 year old man wasn't discovered until 10 years after he hanged himself in his attic.

1. ‘Mummified cadaver’ from Atlas of Legal Medicine by Eduard von Hofmann, 1898. The body of this 50 year old man wasn’t discovered until 10 years after he hanged himself in his attic.

 

2. 'Resection of the maxilla' by Nicolas Henri Jacob from 'Traité complet de l'anatomie de l'homme' by Marc Jean Bourgery, 1831. Anaesthetic was first used in 1846...

2. ‘Resection of the maxilla’ by Nicolas Henri Jacob from ‘Traité complet de l’anatomie de l’homme’ by Marc Jean Bourgery, 1831. Anaesthetic was first used in 1846…

 

3. 'Abnormal twins and placenta' from 'Anatomie pathologique du corps humain' by Jean Cruveilhier, 1829

3. ‘Abnormal twins and placenta’ from ‘Anatomie pathologique du corps humain’ by Jean Cruveilhier, 1829

 

4. 'Severe tubercular leprosy (or ichthyosis) of the hand' from the Wellcome Library, London (original source unknown)

4. ‘Severe tubercular leprosy (or ichthyosis) of the hand’ from the Wellcome Library, London (original source unknown)

The Spooky Saturday Collection: October 2015

This October saw Spooky Saturday 2015 on Facebook and Twitter; a collection of some the most gruesome anatomical artworks I’ve curated through the year.

In the lead up to Halloween, we looked a one artwork each week in a ‘gruesome-off’, let’s see who won and put it to a vote!

Take a look at the four artworks below and cast your vote in the poll!

 

1. 'Tubercules' from 'Traité des Maladies de la Peau' by Pierre François Rayer,1835

1. ‘Tubercules’ from ‘Traité des Maladies de la Peau’ by Pierre François Rayer,1835

 

2. 'Surgical technique for correcting a lazy eye' from 'Traite complet de l'anatomie de l'homme' by Jean Baptiste Marc Bourgery, 1831.

2. ‘Surgical technique for correcting a lazy eye’ from ‘Traite complet de l’anatomie de l’homme’ by Jean Baptiste Marc Bourgery, 1831.

 

3. 'Fetal skeleton, placenta and embryo, and examples of arteriosclerosis' from Thesaurus Anatomicus by Frederik Ruysch, 1701.

3. ‘Fetal skeleton, placenta and embryo, and examples of arteriosclerosis’ from ‘Thesaurus Anatomicus’ by Frederik Ruysch, 1701.

 

4. 'Neoplasm from a rabbit, cartilagenous deposits on the spinal cord, ulcerated Peyer's patches on the small intestine, ulcerated small intestine, intestinal stricture, contractile tissue from a healed burn.' from 'Pathological Anatomy' by Sir Robert Carswell, 1838.

4. ‘Neoplasm from a rabbit, cartilagenous deposits on the spinal cord, ulcerated Peyer’s patches on the small intestine, ulcerated small intestine, intestinal stricture, contractile tissue from a healed burn.’ from ‘Pathological Anatomy’ by Sir Robert Carswell, 1838.